MoveHER Gender-Inclusive Public Transport for Urban Mobility

A session by MoveHER Coalition

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About this Exhibit

Product - All Filipino-assembled electric tricycles distributed to women farmers in the Southern regions of the Philippines, Davao and Basilan provinces, in order to increase social mobility and disaster preparedness of indigenous women who live in both coastal and high-flung areas.

About MoveHER Coalition

MOVEHer is a youth-and-women-led movement by members of the Save A Trike Co. in cooperation with transport industry partners EV Wealth Inc., AVIS Philippines, Davis Taxi Service, and others, that seeks to encourage the transport sector in the Philippines to go beyond gender neutrality. Its project, the "Trikebayan" will be giving away electric tricycles to women drivers around the country. We recognize that by considering the specific expectations, needs and challenges of women as drivers, or passengers, the society will be able to meet the demands of a large part, of transport users. Mobility also allows women to exercise their freedoms at home and “extend their range” of access to markets, jobs, services and other social contacts.

Context on the Global, Regional and National Context of Women’s Economic Empowerment

According to UN Women – the United Nations’ agency on Women Empowerment and Gender Equality, Women’s economic empowerment (WEE) is central to realizing women’s rights and gender equality.

WEE includes women’s ability to participate equally in existing markets; their access to and control over productive resources, access to decent work, control over their own time, lives and bodies; and increased voice, agency and meaningful participation in economic decision-making at all levels from the household to international institutions.

However, UN agency has further emphasized that despite achievements in pushing forward gender equality in the workplace, women still have to bear challenges, such as lower wages than men, under-representation in some industries and sectors, less likely to have access to social protection, and disproportionate responsibility on domestic and child care, and the like. In ASEAN, the country’s gender gap in the labor force participation rate, amounting to 30% remains to be the largest in the region. As cited by the 2018 Global Gender Gap Report, the ration of female to male labor local force remains lower compared to Cambodia, Lao PDR, Vietnam, Thailand and Singapore.

Moreover, the female to male ratio in our country was also lower than Muslim ASEAN Countries of Malaysia and Brunei Darusallam. The National Economic Development Authority (NEDA) – the nation’s socio-economic planning agency cited in its 2019 research on the Determinants of Female Labor Force Participation in the Philippines that the labor force participation rate of Filipino women has largely stagnated at 49 to 50 percent for the most parts of the past two decades.

The NEDA 2019 research further shows that labor force participation rates of women are consistently lower than those of men across all levels of education. The effect of a tertiary education on increasing labor force participation is significantly stronger for women than for men. The attainment of a secondary or higher level of education does not increase the labor force participation of men.

This highlights the importance of investing in the education of women toward the attainment of a college diploma.

Religion and worldview have significant effects on employment opportunities of women. Protestants and other religious affiliations are the most likely to be employed, while Muslims are the least likely to be economically active. The study recommends countering a discrimination in the workplace. Furthermore, the data reveals a higher absorptive capacity of women workers by the services and manufacturing sectors, while it has found a disproportionate representation of women in industries that require more cognitive skills than physical strength.

Therefore, there is a need to spur investments in both the manufacturing and services sectors, and to eliminate barriers to women’s participation in their preferred occupation.

Context of Transport Sector Participation of Women in the Global Context

According to Carvajal and Alam in their article regarding a high level gender discussion co-hosted by the World Bank and the World Resources Institute during the Transforming Transportation 2018 Conference posted in the World Bank blogs, women represent the largest share of public transport users around the world, yet they face many barriers that limit their mobility. The numbers speak for themselves.

Some 80% of women are afraid of being harassed in public spaces. In developing countries, safety concerns and limited access to transport reducing the probability of women participating in the labor market by 16.5%, with serious consequences on the economy: the global GDP could grow by an additional $5.8 trillion if the gender gap in male and female labor force participation is decreased by 25% by 2025 from the data of the International Labor Organization.

Women and men have different mobility needs and patterns, yet transport policies for most countries remain unrelentingly gender-blind. Meanwhile, female participation in the transport sector—as operators, drivers, engineers, and leaders—remains low. They cited the Harvard Business Review, stating that women make up 20% of engineering graduates, but nearly 40% of them either quit or never enter the profession.

As a result, the transport industry remains heavily male-dominated, which only makes it harder for women service users to make themselves heard, and limits incentives for the sector to become more inclusive.

Facing the Challenges and Shaping the New Normal

With the brunt of changes brought by the COVID-19 Pandemic in the labor force and in the transport sector, the challenges can be faced with new opportunities to promote innovation and sustainable transportation, to improve conditions for women in transport and to promote their involvement as part of the transport sector through exploration of new avenues through public-private partnerships.

MOVEHer is a youth-and-women-led movement by members of the Save A Trike Co. in cooperation with transport industry partners EV Wealth Inc., AVIS Philippines, Davis Taxi Service, and others, that seeks to encourage the transport sector in the Philippines to go beyond gender neutrality. Its project, the "Trikebayan" will be giving away electric tricycles to women drivers around the country.

We recognize that by considering the specific expectations, needs and challenges of women as drivers, or passengers, the society will be able to meet the demands of a large part of transport users. Mobility also allows women to exercise their freedoms at home and “extend their range” of access to markets, jobs, services and other social contacts. In addition, women’s mobility does not only mean freedom to move but ensuring the safety of these public spaces for women and girls.

Contact Information

MoveHER Coalition women@peacenetwork.asia

MoveHER Trikebayan official website

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